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English definition of “awake”

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awake

adjective [after verb] uk   /əˈweɪk/ us  
B1 not sleeping: "Is Oliver awake yet?" "Yes, he's wide (= completely) awake and running around his bedroom." I find it so difficult to stay awake during history lessons. I drink a lot of coffee to keep me awake. She used to lie awake at night worrying about how to pay the bills.be awake to sth mainly UK If you are awake to something, you know about it: Businesses need to be awake to the advantages of European integration.
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awake

verb [I or T] uk   /əˈweɪk/ (awoke or US also awaked, awoken) us  
literary to stop sleeping or to make someone stop sleeping: I awoke at seven o'clock. She awoke me at seven. to start to understand or feel something or to make someone start to understand or feel something: The chance meeting awoke the old passion between them. Young people need to awake to the risks involved in casual sex.
Translations of “awake”
in Spanish despertar(se)…
in Arabic مُسْتَيْقِظ…
in Korean 잠이깬…
in Portuguese acordado, desperto…
in French (se) réveiller, (s’)éveiller…
in German aufwecken, aufwachen…
in Catalan despert…
in Japanese 目覚めている, 起きている…
in Chinese (Simplified) 醒着的…
in Chinese (Traditional) 醒着的…
in Italian sveglio, desto…
(Definition of awake from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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