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English definition of “bag”

bag

noun [C] uk   /bæɡ/ us  

bag noun [C] (CONTAINER)

A1 a soft container made out of paper or thin plastic, or a stronger container made of leather, plastic, or other material, usually with a handle, in which you carry personal things or clothes or other things that you need for travelling: a paper/plastic bag a shopping bag (= a bag in which shopping is carried) a bag of apples/nuts Don't eat that whole bag of (= the amount the bag contains) sweets at once. I hadn't even packed my bags (= put the things I need in cases/bags). bags under your eyes dark, loose, or swollen skin under your eyes because of tiredness or old age

bag noun [C] (WOMAN)

slang a rude and insulting name for a woman, especially an older one: Silly old bag!

bag noun [C] (TROUSERS)

bags UK old-fashioned trousers with a wide and loose style: Oxford bags

bag

verb uk   /bæɡ/ (-gg-) us  

bag verb (GET)

[T] informal to get something before other people have a chance to take it: [+ two objects] Bag us some decent seats/Bag some decent seats for us if you get there first, won't you?
See also

bag verb (WIN PRIZE)

[T] UK informal to win sth, especially a prize: He's the bookies' favourite to bag an Oscar. He is eager to bag his fifth victory of the season.

bag verb (KILL)

[T] to hunt and kill an animal or bird

bag verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] Australian English informal to criticize or laugh at someone or something in an unkind way: Stop bagging her (out) - she's doing her best.

bag verb (PUT IN CONTAINER)

[T] to put something in a bag: Shall I bag (up) those tomatoes for you?

bag verb (HANG LOOSELY)

[I] to hang loosely like a bag: I hate these trousers - they bag (out) at the back.
Idioms
(Definition of bag from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bag?
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