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English definition of “bite”

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bite

verb uk   /baɪt/ (bit, bitten) us  

bite verb (USE TEETH)

B1 [I or T] to use your teeth to cut into something or someone: He bit into the apple. He bites his fingernails. [I] When a fish bites, it swallows the food on the hook (= curved piece of wire) at the end of a fishing line: The fish aren't biting today.
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bite verb (SNAKE/INSECT)

If an insect or snake bites you, it injures you by making a small hole in your skin: An insect bit me on the arm.

bite verb (AFFECT BADLY)

[I] to have a bad or unpleasant effect: Higher mortgage rates are beginning to bite.

bite verb (SHOW INTEREST)

[I] to show interest in buying something: The new service is now available but clients don't seem to be biting.

bite

noun uk   /baɪt/ us  

bite noun (USING TEETH)

B2 [C] the act of biting something: He took a bite (= bit a piece) out of the apple.

bite noun (INJURY)

B2 [C] a sore place or injury where a person, an animal, or an insect has bitten you

bite noun (FISH)

[S] the act of a fish biting the hook (= curved piece of wire) on the end of a fishing line so that it is caught

bite noun (FOOD)

have a bite to eat C2 ( also have a quick bite) informal to eat a small amount of food or a small meal

bite noun (STRONG TASTE)

[U] If food has bite, it has a sharp or strong taste: I like mustard with bite.

bite noun (STRONG EFFECT)

[U] a powerful effect: This satire has (real) bite.
(Definition of bite from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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