boil - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “boil”

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boil

verb uk   us   /bɔɪl/

boil verb (HEAT LIQUID)

A2 [I or T] to reach, or cause something to reach, the temperature at which a liquid starts to turn into a gas: Liquid nitrogen boils at a very low temperature. She scalded herself on some boiling water. If you give water to a small baby to drink, you have to boil it first.B1 [I or T] to heat a container, especially one used for cooking, until the liquid in it starts to turn into a gas: The pan's boiling.mainly UK Could you boil the kettle for me?B1 [T] to cook food by putting it in water that is boiling: I've boiled some potatoes for dinner. boiled carrotsboil dry If a container or food boils dry, all the liquid in the container in which the food was cooking turns to gas. [T] to wash clothes in a container of very hot water
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boil verb (BE ANGRY)

[I usually continuous] informal to be extremely angry: He was boiling with rage.

boil

noun uk   us   /bɔɪl/

boil noun (SWELLING)

[C] a painful swelling on the skin that is filled with pus (= thick, yellow liquid)

boil noun (HEAT)

[S] the act of washing or cooking something in very hot watera/the boil the state of boiling: UK Bring the water to the boil, then add the pasta.US Bring the water to a boil, then add the pasta. Let the liquid come to a/the boil and then reduce the heat.
(Definition of boil from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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