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English definition of “bracket”

bracket

noun uk   /ˈbræk.ɪt/ us  

bracket noun (SYMBOL)

B2 [C usually plural] either of two symbols put around a word, phrase, or sentence in a piece of writing to show that what is between them should be considered as separate from the main part: Biographical information is included in brackets.UK You should include the date of publication in round brackets after the title.

bracket noun (GROUP)

C1 [C] a group with fixed upper and lower limits: They were both surgeons in a high income bracket. Most British university students are in the 18–22 age bracket. Her pay rise brought her into a new tax bracket.

bracket noun (SUPPORT)

[C] a piece of metal, wood, or plastic, usually L-shaped, that is fastened to a wall and used to support something such as a shelf

bracket

verb [T] uk   /ˈbræk.ɪt/ us  

bracket verb [T] (USE SYMBOL)

to put brackets around words, phrases, numbers, etc.: I've bracketed the bits of text that could be omitted.

bracket verb [T] (PUT IN GROUP)

If you bracket two or more things or people, you consider them to be similar or connected to each other: He's often bracketed with the romantic poets of this period although this does not reflect the range of his work.
(Definition of bracket from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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