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English definition of “bridge”

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bridge

noun uk   /brɪdʒ/ us  

bridge noun (LARGE STRUCTURE)

A2 [C] a structure that is built over a river, road, or railway to allow people and vehicles to cross from one side to the other: We drove across/over the bridge. the Brooklyn BridgeC2 [C usually singular] something that makes it easier to make a change from one situation to another: Part-time work can provide a bridge between staying at home and working full-time.
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bridge noun (PART OF A SHIP)

[C] the raised part of a ship on which the captain and other officers stand and from where they control the movement of the ship

bridge noun (NOSE)

[C usually singular] the top part of the nose, between the eyes, or (on a pair of glasses) the piece that is supported by the top part of the nose: The blow caught him right on the bridge of his nose.

bridge noun (GAME)

[U] a card game for four players who play in pairs

bridge noun (TEETH)

[C] ( also bridgework [U]) a piece of material that contains one or more artificial teeth and is kept in place by being fastened to the natural teeth

bridge noun (MUSICAL INSTRUMENT)

[C] a small piece of wood over which the strings are stretched on a musical instrument such as a guitar or violin

bridge

verb [T] uk   /brɪdʒ/ us  

bridge verb [T] (BRING TOGETHER)

to make the difference or division between two things smaller or less severe: We must bridge the gap between employees and management.

bridge verb [T] (BUILD)

to build a bridge over or across something: The river had been bridged at its narrowest point.
(Definition of bridge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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