buckle - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “buckle”

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buckle

noun [C] uk   us   /ˈbʌk.l̩/
a piece of metal at one end of a belt or strap, used to fasten the two ends together

buckle

verb uk   us   /ˈbʌk.l̩/

buckle verb (FASTEN)

[T or I] to fasten or be fastened with a buckle

buckle verb (BEND)

[T or I] to bend something or become bent, often as a result of force, heat, or weakness: The intense heat from the fire had caused the factory roof to buckle. Both wheels on the bicycle had been badly buckled. I felt faint and my knees began to buckle.

buckle verb (BE DEFEATED)

buckle under sth to be defeated by a difficult situation: But these were difficult times and a lesser man would have buckled under the strain.
buckled
adjective uk   us   /-l̩d/
a tightly buckled belt
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “buckle”
in Arabic بُكْل, إبْزيم…
in Korean 버클, 죔쇠…
in Malaysian kepala tali pinggang…
in French boucle…
in Turkish toka kopça…
in Italian fibbia…
in Chinese (Traditional) (皮帶等的)搭扣,扣環…
in Russian пряжка…
in Polish sprzączka…
in Vietnamese cái khoá (thắt lưng…)…
in Spanish hebilla…
in Portuguese fivela…
in Thai หัวเข็มขัด…
in German die Schnalle…
in Catalan sivella…
in Japanese (ベルトの)バックル, 留め金…
in Indonesian gesper…
in Chinese (Simplified) (皮带等的)搭扣,扣环…
(Definition of buckle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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