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English definition of “career”

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career

noun [C] uk   /kəˈrɪər/ us    /-ˈrɪr/
B1 the job or series of jobs that you do during your working life, especially if you continue to get better jobs and earn more money: He's hoping for a career in the police force/as a police officer. When he retires he will be able to look back over a brilliant career (= a working life which has been very successful). It helps if you can move a few rungs up the career ladder before taking time off to have a baby. I took this new job because I felt that the career prospects were much better. Judith is very career-minded/-oriented (= gives a lot of attention to her job).
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career

verb [I usually + adv/prep] uk   /kəˈrɪər/ us    /-ˈrɪr/
(especially of a vehicle) to move fast and in a way that is out of control: The coach careered down a slope and collided with a bank.
Translations of “career”
in Korean 직업, 경력…
in Arabic مِهْنة…
in French carrière…
in Turkish meslek, iş, meslek yaşamı…
in Italian carriera…
in Chinese (Traditional) 生涯,職業, 事業…
in Russian карьера…
in Polish kariera…
in Spanish carrera…
in Portuguese carreira…
in German die Karriere, die Laufbahn…
in Catalan carrera…
in Japanese (一生の仕事としての)職業…
in Chinese (Simplified) 生涯,职业, 事业…
(Definition of career from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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