chance Definition in Cambridge British English Dictionary
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Definition of "chance" - British English Dictionary

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chancenoun

uk   /tʃɑːns/  us   /tʃæns/

chance noun (OPPORTUNITY)

B1 [C] an occasion that allows something to be done: I didn't get/have a chance to speak to her. [+ to infinitive] If you give me a chance to speak, I'll explain. Society has to give prisoners a second chance when they come out of jail. He left and I missed my chance to say goodbye to him. I'd go now given half a chance (= if I had the slightest opportunity).
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chance noun (POSSIBILITY)

B1 [S or plural] the level of possibility that something will happen: You'd have a better chance/more chance of passing your exams if you worked a bit harder. [+ (that)] There's a good chance (that) I'll have this essay finished by tomorrow. There's a slim/slight chance (that) I might have to go to Manchester next week. If we hurry, there's still an outside (= very small) chance of catching the plane. "Is there any chance of speaking to him?" "Not a/No chance, I'm afraid." I don't think I stand/have a chance of winning.UK John thinks they're in with a chance (= they have a possibility of doing or getting what they want). Her resignation has improved my chances of promotion. What are her chances of survival? [+ that] What are the chances that they'll win?
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chance noun (RISK)

B2 [C] a possibility that something negative will happen: I'm delivering my work by hand - I'm not taking any chances. There's a chance of injury in almost any sport.
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chance noun (LUCK)

B1 [U] the force that causes things to happen without any known cause or reason for doing so: Roulette is a game of chance. I got this job completely by chance. [+ (that)] It was pure/sheer chance (that) we met. We must double-check everything and leave nothing to chance.by any chance C2 used to ask a question or request in a polite way: Are you Hungarian, by any chance? Could you lend me a couple of pounds, by any chance? You wouldn't, by any chance, have a calculator on you, would you?

chanceverb

uk   /tʃɑːns/  us   /tʃæns/

chance verb (RISK)

[T] to risk something: You'd be a fool to chance your life savings on a single investment.

chance verb (LUCK)

[I] old-fashioned or literary to happen or do something by chance: [+ to infinitive] They chanced to be in the restaurant when I arrived. I chanced on/upon (= found unexpectedly) some old love letters in a drawer. Ten years after leaving school, we chanced on/upon (= unexpectedly met) each other in Regent Street.
(Definition of chance from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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