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English definition of “change”

change

verb uk   /tʃeɪndʒ/ us  

change verb (BECOME DIFFERENT)

A1 [T] to exchange one thing for another thing, especially of a similar type: She's just changed jobs. Let's change the subject (= talk about something different). A2 [I or T] to make or become different: I almost didn't recognize her - she'd changed so much. That was 20 years ago and things have changed since then. Nothing changes, does it - I've been away two years and the office still looks exactly the same. People have changed their diets a lot over the past few years. I'm going to change my hairstyle. B1 [I or T] to take something you have bought back to a shop and exchange it for something else: I had to change those trousers I bought for (= take them back to the shop in order to get) a bigger pair. change your mind B1 to form a new opinion or make a new decision about something that is different from your old one: If you change your mind about coming tonight, just give me a call. When I first met him I didn't like him but I've changed my mind. change for the better to improve: Her attitude has definitely changed for the better since she started this new job. change places to be in someone else's situation: I wouldn't change places with him for the world! change your ways to improve the bad parts of your behaviour: If he wants to carry on living here, he's going to have to change his ways and learn to be a bit less messy.

change verb (TRANSPORT)

A2 [I or T] to get off a train, bus, etc. and catch another in order to continue a journey: I had to change (trains) twice to get there. Change at Peterborough for York.

change verb (MONEY)

A2 [T] to get or give money in exchange for money, either because you want it in smaller units, or because you want the same value in foreign money: Could you change a £10 note (for two fives), please? Could you change a £5 note for me? I need to change my dollars for/into English money.

change verb (CLOTHES/BEDS)

A2 [I or T] to remove one set of clothes and put a different set on yourself or a young child, especially a baby, or to remove dirty sheets from a bed and put clean ones on it: You don't need to change - you look great as you are. I'll just change into (= get dressed in) something a bit smarter. Give me five minutes to change out of (= remove) my work clothes and I'll come out with you. How often do you think he changes his shirt? Could you change the baby (= the baby's nappy)? I've changed the sheets/the bed (= the sheets on the bed) in the guest room.

change verb (WIND/SEA)

[I] When the wind or the tide (= the rise and fall of the sea) changes, it starts to move in a different direction: The tide is starting to change.

change verb (SPEED)

[I or T] (US usually shift) to put a vehicle into a different gear, usually in order to change the speed at which it is moving: to change gear I changed into fourth (gear).UK Change down to go round the corner.

change

noun uk   /tʃeɪndʒ/ us  

change noun (BECOMING DIFFERENT)

A2 [C or U] the act of becoming different, or the result of something becoming different: Let me know if there's any change in the situation. We're living in a time of great change. We need a change of government. a change in lifestyle They've made a lot of changes to the house. The new management will make fundamental/radical/sweeping changes (= do things in a very different way). B1 [S] something that is pleasant or interesting because it is unusual or new: It's nice to see her smile for a change. "Shall we we eat in the garden?" "Why not - it'll make a change." We've always had a red car - it's time we had a change! change of scene a new situation: She'd been with the same company for too many years and felt she needed a change of scene, so she applied for a job as a stage manager.

change noun (MONEY)

A2 [U] money in the form of coins rather than notes: She gave me £5 in change. My dad always used to carry a lot of loose/small change (= coins) in his pocket. [U] smaller units of money given in exchange for larger units of the same amount: Do you have change for a 20-dollar bill? A2 [U] the money that is returned to someone who has paid for something that costs less than the amount that they gave: I think you've given me the wrong change.

change noun (CLOTHES)

[C] the action of putting on different clothes: She did a quick change before going on TV. a change of clothes A2 a set of clothes as well as the ones that you are wearing: You'll need a change of clothes if you're staying overnight.

change noun (TRANSPORT)

[C] the action of getting off a train, bus, etc. and catching another in order to continue a journey: I hate journeys where you've got a lot of changes.
(Definition of change from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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