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English definition of “cloud”

cloud

noun uk   /klaʊd/ us  

cloud noun (IN SKY)

A2 [C or U] a grey or white mass in the sky, made up of very small floating drops of water: Do you think those are rain clouds on the horizon? The sky was a perfect blue - not a cloud in sight. There was so much cloud, we couldn't see anything. Dark clouds massed on the horizon.

cloud noun (MASS)

B2 [C] a mass of something such as dust or smoke that looks like a cloud: On the eastern horizon, a huge cloud of smoke from burning oil tanks stretched across the sky. The initial cloud of tear gas had hardly cleared before shots were fired.

cloud noun (COMPUTING)

the cloud [S] a computer network where files and programs can be stored, especially the internet: All the photographs are kept on the cloud rather than on hard drives.

cloud

verb uk   /klaʊd/ us  
[I or T] If something transparent clouds, or if something clouds it, it becomes difficult to see through. C2 [T] to make someone confused, or make something more difficult to understand: When it came to explaining the lipstick on his collar, he found that drink had clouded (= confused) his memory.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of cloud from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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