cold - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “cold”

See all translations

cold

adjective uk   /kəʊld/  us   /koʊld/

cold adjective (LOW TEMPERATURE)

A1 at a low temperature, especially when compared to the temperature of the human body, and not hot, or warm: a cold day/house cold food/water cold hands cold weather My feet are so cold. It's freezing cold today. You'll feel cold if you don't wear a coat.
More examples

cold adjective (UNFRIENDLY)

B1 not showing kindness, love, or emotion and not friendly: His handshake was cold, and his eyes lifeless. He stared into her cold blue eyes. She would never feel welcome in this city with its cold, unsmiling inhabitants. The school was a cold, unwelcoming place.
coldness
noun [U] uk   /ˈkəʊld.nəs/  us   /ˈkoʊld-/
C2 It was the coldness of her manner that struck me.

cold

noun uk   /kəʊld/  us   /koʊld/

cold noun (ILLNESS)

A2 [C] a common infection, especially in the nose and throat, that often causes a cough, a slight fever, and sometimes some pain in the muscles: I've got a cold. She caught a cold at school.UK informal Don't come near me - I've got a stinking/streaming cold (= extremely bad cold).

cold noun (LOW TEMPERATURE)

B1 [S or U] cold weather or temperatures: Don't stand out there in the cold, come in here and get warm. Old people tend to feel the cold (= feel uncomfortable in cold temperatures) more than the young. My feet were numb with cold.
(Definition of cold from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of cold?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “cold” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

airwaves

the radio waves used for broadcasting radio and television programmes, or, more generally, radio or television broadcasting time

Word of the Day

They sometimes go here and they never go there: using adverbs of frequency

by Liz Walter,
April 29, 2015
Sometimes, always, often, never: these are some of the most common words in English.  Unfortunately, they are also some of the words that cause the most problems for students. Many of my students put them in the wrong place, often because that’s where they go in their own languages. They say things

Read More 

e-juice noun

April 27, 2015
the liquid content in an e-cigarette, which includes nicotine and may be flavoured in various ways Contestants…suck on a modified vaper until they’ve filled their chest cavity with enough vaporised nicotine “e-juice” to shoot out a belch of white smoke upwards of 4ft long.

Read More