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English definition of “connection”

connection

noun uk   /kəˈnek.ʃən/ us  

connection noun (RELATION)

B2 [C] the state of being related to someone or something else: The connection between smoking and heart disease is well known. They're sisters, are they? I knew their surname was the same, but I never made (= thought of) the connection. in connection with sth B2 on the subject of something: They want to talk to you in connection with an unpaid tax bill.

connection noun (JOIN)

B1 [C or U] the act of joining or being joined to something else, or the part or process that makes this possible: The electricity company guarantees connection within 24 hours. It's no wonder your shaver isn't working. There's a loose connection (= a connecting wire has become loose) in the plug. [C] the state of being joined or connected in some way connections [plural] the people you know and who can help you: He only got the job because of his connections! He has important connections in Washington.

connection noun (PHONE)

[C] the way that two people can speak to each other by phone: Sorry, could you repeat that? This is a very bad connection.

connection noun (TRANSPORT)

B2 [C] a bus, train, plane, etc. that arrives at a suitable time for passengers to get on after getting off another one so that they can continue their journey: If the flight is late, we'll miss our connection.
(Definition of connection from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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