dead - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “dead”

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dead

adjective uk   us   /ded/

dead adjective (NOT LIVING)

A2 not now living: She's been dead for 20 years now. The motorcyclist was dead on arrival at the hospital. He was shot dead (= killed by shooting) outside his home.C2 mainly UK If a part of your body is dead, you cannot feel it: I've been sitting with my legs crossed for so long, my right leg has gone dead.
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dead adjective (NOT IN USE)

UK If glasses and bottles that were previously full are dead, they are now empty. In some sports, if a ball is dead, it is outside the area of play.

dead adjective (BORING)

C2 If a place is dead, it is too quiet and nothing interesting happens there: The city centre is quite lively during the day, but it's totally dead at night.

dead adjective (EQUIPMENT)

B2 If a piece of equipment is dead, it is not working: a dead battery The phone suddenly went dead.

dead

adjective [before noun], adverb uk   us   /ded/
C1 complete(ly): The conductor waited for dead silence before commencing the performance. The post office is dead (= straight) ahead. Aim for the dead (= exact) centre of the target. I always try to arrive dead (= exactly) on time. UK informal very: The exam was dead easy. I'm dead hungry. "How was the film?" "It was dead good."dead set against (doing) sth (UK also dead against (doing) sth) to be completely opposed to something: He's dead set against living in the city. You won't be able to change his mind - he's dead against the plan.dead set on (doing) sth to be very determined to do or have something: Martha's dead set on having a new bike.

dead

noun uk   us   /ded/
the dead [plural] dead people: Three children were among the dead. A ceasefire has been called to allow the survivors to bury their dead.
(Definition of dead from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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