defend Definition in Cambridge British English Dictionary
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Definition of "defend" - British English Dictionary

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defendverb

uk   us   /dɪˈfend/

defend verb (PROTECT)

B1 [T] to protect someone or something against attack or criticism; to speak in favour of someone or something: How can we defend our homeland if we don't have an army? White blood cells help defend the body against infection. They are fighting to defend their beliefs/interests/rights. He vigorously defended his point of view. The president was asked how he could defend (= explain his support for) a policy that increased unemployment. I'm going to karate lessons to learn how to defend myself.UK The Bank of England intervened this morning to defend the pound (= stop it from losing value).
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defend verb (IN COURT OF LAW)

to act as a lawyer for someone who has been accused of something in a court of law and try to prove that they are not guilty : I can't afford a lawyer, so I shall defend myself (= argue my own case in a court of law).

defend verb (IN SPORT)

[T] to compete in a sports competition that you won before and try to win it again: He will defend his 1,500 metre title this weekend. The defending champion will play her first match of the tournament tomorrow. [I] to try to prevent the opposing player or players from scoring points, goals, etc. in a sport: In the last ten minutes of the game, we needed to defend.
(Definition of defend from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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