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English definition of “depth”

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depth

noun uk   /depθ/ us  

depth noun (DISTANCE DOWN)

B1 [C or U] the distance down either from the top of something to the bottom, or to a distance below the top surface of something: the depth of a lake/pond There are very few fish at depths (= distances below the surface) below 3,000 metres. The river froze to a depth of over a metre.the depths [plural] literary the lowest part of the sea: The ship sank slowly to the depths of the ocean.
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depth noun (SERIOUSNESS)

B2 [C or U] the state of having serious qualities or the ability to think seriously about something: Terry lacks depth - he's a very superficial person. Her writing shows astonishing depth. Jo has hidden depths (= serious qualities that you do not see immediately).in depth B2 in a serious and detailed way: I'd like to look at this question in some depth.
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depth noun (DISTANCE BACKWARDS)

[C or U] the distance from the front to the back of something: Measure the depth of the cupboard/shelf.

depth noun (STRENGTH)

C2 [C or U] the fact of a feeling, state, or characteristic being strong, extreme, or detailed: He spoke with great depth of feeling. I was amazed at the depth of her knowledge.in the depth(s) of sth experiencing an extreme and negative emotion: He was in the depths of despair/depression about losing his job. during the worst period of a bad situation: The company was started in the depth of the recession of the 1930s.

depth noun (LOW SOUND)

[U] the quality of having a low sound: The depth of his voice makes him sound older than he is.

depth noun (DARKNESS)

[U] the fact of something, especially a colour, having the quality of being dark and strong: I love the depth of colour in her early paintings.
(Definition of depth from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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