die Definition in Cambridge British English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of "die" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

dieverb [I]

uk   us   /daɪ/ (present participle dying, past tense and past participle died)
A1 to stop living or existing, either suddenly or slowly: Twelve people died in the accident. She died of/from hunger/cancer/a heart attack/her injuries. It is a brave person who will die for their beliefs. I would like to die in my sleep (= while I am sleeping). Many people have a fear of dying. Our love will never die. She will not tell anyone - the secret will die with her.die a natural/violent death to die naturally, violently, etc.: He died a violent death. My grandmother died a natural death (= did not die of illness or because she was killed), as she would have wanted. informal If a machine stops working, or if an object cannot be used or repaired any more, usually because it is very old, people sometimes say it has died: The engine just died on us.humorous He wore his jeans until they died.
More examples

dienoun [C]

uk   us   /daɪ/

die noun [C] (TOOL)

a shaped piece or mould (= hollow container) made of metal or other hard material, used to shape or put a pattern on metal or plastic

die noun [C] (GAME)

US also or old use (UK dice) a small cube (= object with six equal square sides) with a different number of spots on each side, used in games involving chance
(Definition of die from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of die?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “die” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With the USA’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More