disadvantage Definition in British English Dictionary
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Definition of "disadvantage" - British English Dictionary

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disadvantagenoun [C or U]

uk   /ˌdɪs.ədˈvɑːn.tɪdʒ/  us   /-ˈvæn.t̬ɪdʒ/
B1 a condition or situation that causes problems, especially one which causes something or someone to be less successful than other things or people: One disadvantage of living in the town is the lack of safe places for children to play. We need to consider whether the disadvantages of the plan outweigh the advantages.at a disadvantage C2 in a situation in which you are less likely to succeed than others: He's at a disadvantage being so shy. This new law places/puts poorer families at a distinct disadvantage.
More examples
disadvantageous
adjective uk   /ˌdɪsˌæd.vənˈteɪ.dʒəs/  us   /-væn-/

disadvantageverb [T]

uk   /ˌdɪs.ədˈvɑːn.tɪdʒ/  us   /-ˈvæn.t̬ɪdʒ/
to cause someone or something to be less successful than most other people or things: Teachers claim such measures could unfairly disadvantage ethnic minorities.
Translations of “disadvantage”
in Arabic عَيْب, ضَرَر…
in Korean 약점, 불리한 점…
in Malaysian kelemahan…
in French désavantage…
in Turkish mahsur, sakınca, dezavantaj…
in Italian svantaggio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 劣勢,不利因素…
in Russian невыгодное положение, недостаток…
in Polish minus, wada…
in Vietnamese sự bất lợi…
in Spanish desventaja…
in Portuguese desvantagem, prejuízo, inconveniente…
in Thai ข้อเสียเปรียบ…
in German der Nachteil…
in Catalan desavantatge…
in Japanese 不利なこと…
in Indonesian kekurangan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 劣势,不利因素…
(Definition of disadvantage from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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