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English definition of “drill”

drill

noun [C] uk   /drɪl/ us  

drill noun [C] (TOOL)

a tool or machine that makes holes: an electric/pneumatic drill a dentist's drill a drill bit (= the sharp part of the drill that cuts the hole)

drill noun [C] (REGULAR ACTIVITY)

an activity that practises a particular skill and often involves repeating the same thing several times, especially a military exercise intended to train soldiers: In some of these schools, army-style drills are used to instil a sense of discipline. a spelling/pronunciation drill

drill

verb uk   /drɪl/ us  

drill verb (MAKE HOLE)

[I or T] to make a hole in something using a special tool: Drill three holes in the wall for the screws. They are going to drill for oil nearby.

drill verb (PRACTISE)

[I or T] to practise something, especially military exercises, or to make someone do this: We watched the soldiers drilling on the parade ground. [T usually + adv/prep] to tell someone something repeatedly to make them remember it: It was drilled into us at an early age that we should always say "please" and "thank you". He drilled the children in what they should say.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of drill from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of drill?
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