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English definition of “example”

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example

noun [C] uk   /ɪɡˈzɑːm.pl̩/ us    /-ˈzæm-/

example noun [C] (TYPICAL CASE)

A1 something that is typical of the group of things that it is a member of: Could you give me an example of the improvements you have mentioned? This painting is a marvellous example of her work.
See also
A1 a way of helping someone to understand something by showing them how it is used: Study the examples first of all, then attempt the exercises on the next page.for example A1 used when giving an example of the type of thing you mean: Offices can easily become more environmentally-friendly by, for example, using recycled paper.
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example noun [C] (BEHAVIOUR)

B2 a person or a way of behaving that is considered suitable to be copied: He's a very good example to the rest of the class. He's decided to follow the example of his father and study law.
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example noun [C] (PUNISHMENT)

a punishment that is intended to warn others against doing the thing that is being punished, or a person who receives such a punishment: The judge made an example of him and gave him the maximum possible sentence.
Translations of “example”
in Korean 예…
in Arabic مِثال…
in French spécimen, exemple (de), exemple (pour)…
in Turkish örnek, misal, numune…
in Italian esempio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 典型事例, 典型, 範例…
in Russian пример, образец…
in Polish przykład…
in Spanish ejemplo…
in Portuguese exemplo…
in German das Beispiel, das Vorbild, die Warnung…
in Catalan exemple…
in Japanese 例…
in Chinese (Simplified) 典型事例, 典型, 范例…
(Definition of example from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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