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English definition of “gear”

gear

noun uk   /ɡɪər/ us    /ɡɪr/

gear noun (ENGINE PART)

B2 [C or U] a device, often consisting of connecting sets of wheels with teeth (= points) around the edge, that controls how much power from an engine goes to the moving parts of a machine: Does your car have four or five gears? I couldn't find reverse gear. The car should be in gear (= with its gears in position, allowing the vehicle to move). When you start a car you need to be in first (US also low) gear.figurative After a slow start, the leadership campaign suddenly shifted into top gear (= started to advance very quickly). change gear UK (US also shift gear) to change the position of the gears to make a vehicle go faster or more slowly

gear noun (CLOTHES/EQUIPMENT)

B2 [U] the equipment, clothes, etc. that you use to do a particular activity: fishing/camping gear Police in riot gear (= protective clothing) arrived to control the protesters.
See also
B2 informal clothes: She wears all the latest gear.

gear noun (DRUGS)

[U] UK slang drugs: The traffickers knew that there would always be someone willing to move the gear.
(Definition of gear from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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