gut - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “gut”

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gut

noun uk   us   /ɡʌt/

gut noun (BOWELS)

[U] the long tube in the body of a person or animal, through which food moves during the process of digesting food: Meat stays in the gut longer than vegetable matter. [C] informal a person's stomach when it is extremely large: He's got a huge beer gut (= large stomach caused by drinking beer).guts C2 [plural] bowels: My guts hurt. He got a knife in the guts.gut feeling/reaction informal a strong belief about someone or something that cannot completely be explained and does not have to be decided by reasoning: I have a gut feeling that the relationship won't last. [U] a strong thread made from an animal's bowels used, especially in the past, for making musical instruments and sports rackets

gut noun (BRAVERY)

guts B2 [plural] informal courage in dealing with danger or uncertainty: [+ to infinitive] It takes a lot of guts to admit to so many people that you've made a mistake.

gut

verb [T] uk   us   /ɡʌt/ (-tt-)

gut verb [T] (EMPTY A BUILDING)

to destroy the inside of a building completely, usually by fire: A fire gutted the bookshop last week. to remove the inside parts and contents of a building, usually so that it can be decorated in a completely new way

gut verb [T] (REMOVE ORGANS)

to remove the inner organs of an animal, especially in preparation for eating it: She gutted the fish and cut off their heads.
(Definition of gut from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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