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English definition of “high”

high

adjective uk   /haɪ/ us  

high adjective (DISTANCE)

A2 (especially of things that are not living) being a large distance from top to bottom or a long way above the ground, or having the stated distance from top to bottom: a high building/mountain high ceilings It's two and a half metres high and one metre wide. The corn grew waist-high (= as high as a person's waist) in the fields.

high adjective (ABOVE AVERAGE)

B1 greater than the usual level or amount: The job demands a high level of concentration. He suffers from high blood pressure. Antique furniture fetches very high prices these days. She got very high marks in her geography exam. It's very dangerous to drive at high speed when the roads are wet. He's in a high-security prison. high in sth C1 containing a large quantity of something: I avoid foods that are high in fat. high standards/principles B1 very good or very moral standards: She was a woman of high principles. She demands very high standards from the people who work for her. high winds fast, strong wind: High winds caused delays on the ferries.

high adjective (IMPORTANT)

B2 having power, an important position, or great influence: an officer of high rank

high adjective (SOUND)

near or at the top of the range of sounds: I can't reach the high notes.

high adjective (BAD)

UK (of food) smelling bad and no longer good to eat: This meat is rather high - I'm going to throw it out.

high adjective (MENTAL STATE)

C2 not thinking or behaving normally because of taking drugs: He was high on heroin at the time.

high

noun uk   /haɪ/ us  

high

(Definition of high from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of high?
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