himself - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “himself”

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himself

pronoun uk   us   /hɪmˈself/

himself pronoun (MALE)

A2 used to refer to a male object of a verb that is the same person or animal as the subject of the verb: He'd cut himself shaving. Most nights he would cry himself to sleep.B2 used to emphasize a particular man, boy, or male animal: Did you want to talk to the chairman himself, or could his personal assistant help you? Tom was going to buy a bookcase, but in the end he made one himself.(all) by himself A2 If a man or boy does something by himself, he does it alone or without help from anyone else: Little Timmy made that snowman all by himself. Why did you leave your little brother by himself?(all) to himself for his use only: Johnny's got the apartment to himself next week.not be/seem/feel himself not to be, seem, or feel as happy or as healthy as usual: Is Tom all right? He doesn't seem quite himself this morning.in himself UK informal used when describing or asking about a man's state of mind when he is physically ill: He's well enough in himself - he just can't shake this cold off.
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himself pronoun (FEMALE/MALE)

used to refer to an object of a verb that is the same person or animal as the subject of the verb, when referring to a person or animal whose sex is not known or not considered to be important: Any fool can teach himself to type.
(Definition of himself from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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