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English definition of “hope”

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hope

verb [I or T] uk   /həʊp/ us    /hoʊp/

hope

noun [C or U] uk   /həʊp/ us    /hoʊp/
B1 something good that you want to happen in the future, or a confident feeling about what will happen in the future: What are your hopes and dreams for the future? Is there any hope of getting financial support for the project? [+ that] Is there any hope that they will be home in time? Young people are growing up in our cities without any hope of finding a job. His reply dashed (= destroyed) our hopes. They have pinned (all) their hopes on (= they are depending for success on) their new player. She's very ill, but there's still hope/we live in hope (= we think she might be cured). The situation is now beyond/past hope (= unlikely to produce the desired result). We never gave up hope (= stopped hoping) that she would be found alive. The letter offered us a glimmer/ray of (= a little) hope. I didn't phone until four o'clock in the hope that you'd be finished. I don't hold out much hope of getting (= I don't expect to be able to get) a ticket.
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Translations of “hope”
in Korean 소망하다, 바라다…
in Arabic يَأمَل…
in French espérer…
in Turkish ummak, ümit etmek, beklemek…
in Italian sperare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 希望,盼望…
in Russian надеяться…
in Polish mieć nadzieję…
in Spanish esperar…
in Portuguese esperar…
in German hoffen…
in Catalan esperar…
in Japanese (~を)願う…
in Chinese (Simplified) 希望,盼望…
(Definition of hope from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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