kill - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “kill”

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kill

verb uk   us   /kɪl/

kill verb (DEATH)

A2 [I or T] to cause someone or something to die: Her parents were killed in a plane crash. Smoking can kill. Food must be heated to a high temperature to kill harmful bacteria.
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kill verb (FINISH)

C2 [T] to stop or destroy a relationship, activity, or experience: Lack of romance can kill a marriage. They gave her some tablets to kill the pain. Kill your speed. [T] mainly US informal (also kill off) to drink all of something: We killed off two six-packs watching the game.

kill verb (EFFORT)

C1 [T] informal to cause someone a lot of effort or difficulty: It wouldn't kill you to apologize. He didn't exactly kill himself trying to get the work finished.

kill verb (HURT)

[T] informal to cause someone a lot of pain: I must sit down, my feet are killing me!

kill verb (ANGER)

A2 [T] informal If you say that someone will kill you, you mean that they will be very angry with you: My sister would kill me if she heard me say that.

kill verb (ENTERTAIN)

[T] mainly US informal to make someone laugh a lot: That comedian kills me.kill yourself informal to laugh very much: We were killing ourselves laughing.
Phrasal verbs

kill

noun [C usually singular] uk   us   /kɪl/
an animal or bird that has been hunted and killed, or the action of killing: The leopard seizes its kill and begins to eat. Like other birds of prey, it quickly moves in for the kill.
(Definition of kill from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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