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English definition of “lose”

lose

verb uk   /luːz/ (lost, lost) us  

lose verb (NOT HAVE)

A2 [T] to no longer have something because you do not know where it is: I've lost my ticket. He's always losing his car keys. A2 [T] to have something or someone taken away from you: At least 600 staff will lose their jobs if the firm closes. He lost his leg in a car accident. She lost her mother (= her mother died) last year. B2 [T] to stop feeling something: to lose confidence/faith I lost interest halfway through the book. He kept on crying and I lost my patience. B1 [T] to have less of something than you had before: I'm trying to lose weight. He's losing his hair. She lost a lot of blood in the accident. to lose your memory/sight B2 [T] If you lose time, you waste it: Four million hours were lost last year through stress-related illnesses. We lost valuable time stuck in traffic. [T] If a clock loses time, it goes more slowly than it should: My watch loses ten minutes every day. [T] informal to get rid of something: Lose the belt and let's see how the dress looks. lose money, pounds, dollars, etc. C1 A business that is losing money is spending more money than it is receiving: Banks will lose millions of pounds because of new legislation.

lose verb (BE DEFEATED)

B1 [I or T] to fail to succeed in a game, competition, etc.: If we lose this game, we're out of the championship. They're losing 3–1. They lost to Arsenal. Everyone hates losing an argument. They hadn't lost an election in 15 years.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of lose from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of lose?
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