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English definition of “movement”

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movement

noun uk   /ˈmuːv.mənt/ us  

movement noun (POSITION CHANGE)

B2 [C or U] a change of position: He made a sudden movement and frightened the bird away. For a long time after the accident, he had no movement in (= was unable to move) his legs. Her movements were rather clumsy.sb's movements what someone is doing during a particular period: I don't know his movements this week.
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movement noun (GROUP OF PEOPLE)

C1 [C, + sing/pl verb] a group of people with a particular set of aims: the women's movement The suffragette movement campaigned for votes for women. [+ to infinitive] a movement to stop animals being killed for their fur

movement noun (CHANGE OPINION)

[C or U] a situation in which people change their opinion or the way that they live or work: There has been a movement towards more women going back to work while their children are still small. Recently there has been some movement away from traditional methods of teaching.

movement noun (PROGRESS)

[U] an occasion when something develops, changes, or happens in a particular way or direction: There has been little movement in the dollar (= it has not changed in value very much) today.

movement noun (MUSIC)

[C] one of the main parts of a piece of classical music: Beethoven's fifth symphony has four movements.

movement noun (CLOCK/WATCH)

[C] the part of a clock or watch that turns the hands (= thin sticks) that point to the time

movement noun (EXCRETE)

[C] polite word (used especially by doctors and nurses) an act of emptying the bowels: When did you last have a (bowel) movement?
(Definition of movement from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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