near adverb, preposition, adjective, verb Definition in British English Dictionary
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Definition of "near" - British English Dictionary

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nearadverb, preposition

uk   /nɪər/  us   /nɪr/
A1 not far away in distance: Is there a restaurant near here? I'd like to sit near a window, please. Don't come too near me - you might catch my cold. The hotel is near the airport. Which bus stop is nearest (to) your house? I was standing just near enough to hear what they were saying.B2 not far away in time: As the date of his operation drew near, he became more and more anxious.UK We can decide which route to take nearer the time.C2 almost in a particular state, or condition: The runners looked near exhaustion.UK I was near (to) tears (= almost cried) at one point during the film.nowhere near C1 not close in distance, time, amount, or quality: The house was nowhere near the beach. It's nowhere near time for us to leave yet. I'm nowhere near finishing the book - I'm only half-way through it. He's nowhere near as tall as his sister.near enough mainly UK informal almost: They're the same age or near enough.
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nearadjective [before noun]

uk   /nɪər/  us   /nɪr/

nearverb [I or T]

uk   /nɪər/  us   /nɪr/
to get close to something in distance, time, or state: I'm pleased to say the project is nearing completion. As the wedding day neared, I started to have second thoughts about getting married. The captain switched on the seat belt sign as we neared the airport.
(Definition of near adverb, preposition, adjective, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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