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English definition of “otherwise”

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otherwise

conjunction uk   /ˈʌð.ə.waɪz/ us    /-ɚ-/
B1 used after an order or suggestion to show what the result will be if you do not follow that order or suggestion: I'd better write it down, otherwise I'll forget it. Phone home, otherwise your parents will start to worry.
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otherwise

adverb uk   /ˈʌð.ə.waɪz/ us    /-ɚ-/

otherwise adverb (DIFFERENTLY)

differently, or in another way: The police believe he is the thief, but all the evidence suggests otherwise (= that he is not). Under the Bill of Rights, a person is presumed innocent until proved otherwise (= guilty). Protestors were executed, jailed or otherwise persecuted. Marion Morrison, otherwise known as the film star John Wayne, was born in 1907. formal I can't meet you on Tuesday - I'm otherwise engaged/occupied (= doing something else).
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otherwise adverb (NOT INCLUDING)

B2 except for what has just been referred to: The bike needs a new saddle, but otherwise it's in good condition. The poor sound quality ruined an otherwise splendid film.

otherwise

adjective [after verb] uk   /ˈʌð.ə.waɪz/ us    /-ɚ-/ formal
used to show that something is completely different from what you think it is or from what was previously stated: He might have told you he was a qualified electrician, but the truth is quite otherwise.
(Definition of otherwise from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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SMART Thesaurus: Either, or, neither, nor

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