pitch - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “pitch”

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pitch

noun uk   us   /pɪtʃ/

pitch noun (SPORTS FIELD)

B2 [C] UK (US field) an area painted with lines for playing particular sports, especially football: a football/hockey/cricket pitch Supporters invaded (= ran onto) the pitch.
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pitch noun (LEVEL)

[C or U] the level or degree of something: The piano and organ were tuned to the same pitch (= note). If you teach children and adults in the same class, it's difficult to get the pitch (= level of difficulty or interest) right. [S] the level of a feeling: By this time their disagreement had reached such a pitch that there was no hope of an amicable conclusion. The children were at fever pitch (= very excited) the day before the party.

pitch noun (PERSUASION)

[C] a speech or act that attempts to persuade someone to buy or do something: The man in the shop gave me his (sales) pitch about quality and reliability. She made a pitch for the job but she didn't get it. [+ to infinitive] The city made a pitch to stage the Olympics. [C] UK a place in a public area where a person regularly sells goods or performs: The flower seller was at his usual pitch outside the station.

pitch noun (SLOPE)

[S] the amount of slope, especially of a roof: This roof has a very steep/high/gentle/low pitch.

pitch noun (BLACK SUBSTANCE)

[U] a thick, black substance that was used in the past to make wooden ships and buildings waterproof

pitch noun (BASEBALL)

[C] a throw in a baseball game: a good/bad pitch

pitch noun (TENT)

[C] UK (US site) the piece of ground on which you can put up a tent, park a caravan, etc.: We chose a large level grassy pitch for our caravan.

pitch

verb uk   us   /pɪtʃ/

pitch verb (MOVE)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to move or be moved suddenly, especially by throwing: She pitched the stone into the river. He pitched the ball too short and the batsman hit it for six. The ball pitched (= landed) short. The bike hit a rut and I was pitched (forward) onto the road. The ship pitched up and down/from side to side in the rough seas.

pitch verb (BASEBALL)

[I or T] in baseball, to throw a ball towards the player with the bat in order for them to try to hit it: Who will be pitching first for the White Sox this evening?

pitch verb (TENT)

B2 [T] to put up a tent and fix it into position: We pitched camp/our tent in the shade.

pitch verb (LEVEL)

[T] to express or set something at a particular level: The tune was pitched (= the notes in it were) too high for me to reach the top notes. A teacher's got to pitch a lesson at the right level for the students.

pitch verb (PERSUADE)

[I or T] mainly US to try to persuade someone to do something: She pitched her idea to me over a business lunch. They are pitching for business at the moment.

pitch verb (SLOPE)

(Definition of pitch from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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