place Definition in Cambridge British English Dictionary
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Definition of "place" - British English Dictionary

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placenoun

uk   us   /pleɪs/

place noun (AREA)

A1 [C] an area, town, building, etc.: Her garden was a cool pleasant place to sit. What was the name of that place we drove through on the way to New York? They decided to go to a pizza place. There are several places of interest to visit in the area. It's important to feel comfortable in your place of work.A2 [C] informal someone's home: I'm looking for a place to live. We'll have the meeting at my place. [S] a suitable area, building, situation, or occasion: University is a great place for making new friends. [+ to infinitive] This meeting isn't the place to discuss your problems, I'm afraid.
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place noun (POSITION)

[C] a position in relation to other things or people: His leg was broken in two places. When you've finished, put the book back in its place on the shelf. This plant needs a warm, sunny place. Will you keep my place (in the queue) (= allow me to come back to the same position)? She spoke to me and I lost my place in the book (= I forgot where I had been reading).
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B1 [C] the seat you will sit in on a particular occasion, or the seat where you usually sit, in the theatre, a class, a train, etc.: My ticket says 6G but there's someone sitting in my place. The children collected their prizes and then went back to their places. Save me a place (= keep a seat for me until I arrive) near the front. [C] the space at a table where one person will sit and eat, usually with a plate and knives, forks, and spoons arranged on it: The waiter showed us to our places and gave us each a menu. He laid six places at the table.B1 [C] a position in an organization, system, or competition: She's got a place at university She's got a place on (US in) a fine-arts course. Our team finished in second place. He took third place third place (= was the third to finish) in the marathon last year. [C] US used after words such as "any" and "some" as a different way of saying "anywhere", "somewhere", etc.: I know I left that book some place - now, where was it? That bar was like no place I'd ever been before.take place B1 to happen: The concert takes place next Thursday.out of place C2 in the wrong place or looking wrong: The boy looked uncomfortable and out of place among the adults.in place C2 If something is in place, it is in its usual or correct position: The chairs are all in place. He screwed the shelf in place. C2 organized: The arrangements are all in place for the concert next Thursday.in place of sb/sth B2 instead of someone or something: You can use margarine in place of butter in some recipes.take the place of sb/sth B2 to be used instead of someone or something
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place noun (DUTY)

[U] what a person should do or is allowed to do, especially according to the rules of society: [+ to infinitive] It's not your place to tell me what to do. I'm not going to criticize his lordship - I know my place (= I know that I am of lower social rank).

placeverb

uk   us   /pleɪs/

place verb (POSITION)

B2 [I or T] to put something in a particular position: She placed the letter in front of me. She placed her name on the list of volunteers. I'd place him among the ten most brilliant scientists of his age. [+ obj + adj ] The horse was placed first/second/third in its first race (= finished the race in first/second/third position).place an advertisement, bet, order, etc. C1 to arrange to have an advertisement, bet, order, etc.: We placed the order for the furniture six weeks ago. They were placing bets (= gambling) on who would win.place emphasis, importance, etc. on sth C2 to give something emphasis, importance, etc.: She placed the emphasis on the word "soon" in order to make sure was understood. He placed importance on a comfortable lifestyle (= it was important to him). [T] to find someone a job: The students are placed in/with companies for a period of work experience.
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place verb (RECOGNIZE)

[T] to recognize someone or remember where you have seen someone and how you know them: She looks familiar but I can't place her - did she use to work here?
(Definition of place from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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