proof noun, adjective, verb - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “proof”

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proof

noun uk   us   /pruːf/

proof noun (SHOWING TRUTH)

B2 [C or U] a fact or piece of information that shows that something exists or is true: [+ that] Do they have any proof that it was Hampson who stole the goods? I have a suspicion that he's having an affair, though I don't have any concrete (= definite) proof. If anyone needs proof of Andrew Davies' genius as a writer, this novel is it. "How old are you?" "21." "Do you have any proof on you?" Keep your receipt as proof of purchase.
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proof noun (PRINTED COPY)

[C] a printed copy of something that is examined and corrected before the final copies are printed: I was busy correcting proofs.

proof

adjective [after noun] uk   us   /pruːf/

proof adjective [after noun] (ALCOHOL)

of the stated alcoholic strength, a higher number meaning a greater amount of alcohol: It says on the bottle that it's 60 percent proof.

proof adjective [after noun] (PROTECTED)

formal providing protection against something: No household security devices are proof against (= protect completely against) the determined burglar. Her virtue would be proof against his charms.

proof

verb [T] uk   us   /pruːf/
to treat a surface with a substance that will protect it against something, especially water
(Definition of proof noun, adjective, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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