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English definition of “protest”

protest

noun uk   /ˈprəʊ.test/ us    /proʊˈtest/
[C or U] a strong complaint expressing disagreement, disapproval, or opposition: Protests have been made/registered by many people who would be affected by the proposed changes. A formal protest was made by the German team about their disqualification from the relay final. Conservation groups have united in protest against the planned new road. B2 [C] an occasion when people show that they disagree with something by standing somewhere, shouting, carrying signs, etc.: a public protest against the war a peaceful/violent protest under protest If something is done under protest, it is done unwillingly: I only went to the meeting under protest.

protest

verb [I or T] uk   /prəˈtest/ us    /ˈproʊ.test/
B2 to show that you disagree with something by standing somewhere, shouting, carrying signs, etc.: A big crowd of demonstrators were protesting against cuts in health spending.US Outside, a group of students were protesting research cuts. B2 to say something forcefully or complain about something: A lot of people protested about the new working hours. They protested bitterly to their employers, but to no avail. [+ that] A young girl was crying, protesting that she didn't want to leave her mother. All through the trial he protested his innocence (= strongly said he was not guilty).
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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