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English definition of “rally”

rally

noun [C] uk   /ˈræl.i/ us  

rally noun [C] (MEETING)

C2 a public meeting of a large group of people, especially supporters of a particular opinion: 5,000 people held an anti-nuclear rally. an election/campaign rally

rally noun [C] (RACE)

C2 a car or motorcycle race, especially over long distances on public roads: The French driver has taken the lead in the Paris-Dakar rally.

rally noun [C] (SPORT)

a continuous exchange of hits between players in tennis, squash or badminton

rally noun [C] (IMPROVEMENT)

an improvement: Share prices fell again today after yesterday's rally.

rally

verb uk   /ˈræl.i/ us  

rally verb (SUPPORT)

[I or T] to (cause to) come together in order to provide support or make a shared effort: Supporters/Opponents of the new shopping development are trying to rally local people in favour of/against it. The prime minister has called on the public to rally to/behind the government. [+ obj + to infinitive ] The general rallied his forces to defend the town. 'Workers of the world unite' was their rallying cry/call (= a phrase said to encourage support).

rally verb (IMPROVE)

[I] to return to a better condition: The nurse said my mother had rallied after a poor night. The team played badly in the first half of the match but rallied in the second. The pound rallied against the dollar in trading today.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of rally from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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