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English definition of “retreat”

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retreat

verb uk   /rɪˈtriːt/ us  

retreat verb (POSITION)

C2 [I often + adv/prep] to go away from a place or person in order to escape from fighting or danger: Attacks by enemy aircraft forced the tanks to retreat (from the city). When she came towards me shouting, I retreated (behind my desk).C2 [I] to go to a quiet safe place in order to avoid a difficult situation: When he's done something wrong, he retreats to his bedroom.
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retreat verb (DECISION)

[I often + adv/prep] to decide not to do something, or to stop believing something, because it causes too many problems: The government is retreating from its promises.

retreat verb (PRICE)

[I] If a price retreats, it goes down after it has gone up: Wheat prices retreated after a two-day increase.

retreat

noun uk   /rɪˈtriːt/ us  

retreat noun (POSITION)

C2 [C usually singular, U] a move back by soldiers or an army, either because they have been defeated or in order to avoid fighting: the retreat from Dunkirk Enemy soldiers are now in (full) retreat.C2 [C] a private and safe place: a country/mountain/lakeside retreat [C or U] a period of time used to pray and study quietly, or to think carefully, away from normal activities and duties: We went on (a) retreat at/to a monastery in Wales.
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retreat noun (DECISION)

[C] a change from previous beliefs or behaviour: The professor's speech marked/signalled a retreat from his usual extreme views.

retreat noun (PRICE)

[S or U] a situation in which the price of something goes down: Over the past few weeks we have seen the currency's big retreat from its historic high.
(Definition of retreat from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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