Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “shaft”

shaft

noun [C] uk   /ʃɑːft/ us    /ʃæft/

shaft noun [C] (LONG OBJECT)

a pole or rod that forms the handle of a tool or weapon: the shaft of a golf club a rod forming part of a machine such as an engine, that turns in order to pass power on to the machine: the drive shaft of a car the propeller shaft of an aircraft
See also
specialized medical the part of the hair above the scalp specialized medical a long structure like a stem in the body shaft of light a beam of light: A shaft of (sun)light came through the open door.

shaft noun [C] (PASSAGE)

a long, either vertical or sloping, passage through a building or through the ground: a lift (US an elevator) shaft a ventilation/air shaft a well shaft

shaft noun [C] (REMARK)

literary a clever remark, especially one that is intended as an attack on someone or something: John came out with an unexpected shaft of wit/wisdom.

shaft noun [C] (TREATMENT)

the shaft US informal unfair treatment: After years of loyal service, his boss gave him the shaft by firing him just before he would have qualified for a pension.

shaft

verb [T] uk   /ʃɑːft/ us    /ʃæft/ informal
to cheat or trick someone, or to treat someone unfairly: She was shafted by her agent over the film rights to her book.
(Definition of shaft from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of shaft?
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Poles, rods, shafts and sticks, but you might be interested in these topics from the Objects topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More meanings of “shaft”

Definitions of “shaft” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

dawn on sb

If a fact dawns on you, you understand it after a period of not understanding it.

Word of the Day

The language of work

by Kate Woodford,
October 15, 2014
Most of us talk about our jobs. We tell our family and friends interesting or funny things that have happened in the workplace (=room where we do our job), we describe – and sometimes complain about – our bosses and colleagues and when we meet someone for the first time, we tell

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More