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English definition of “skin”

skin

noun uk   /skɪn/ us  

skin noun (NATURAL COVERING)

B1 [C or U] the natural outer layer that covers a person, animal, fruit, etc.: dark/fair/pale/tanned skin skin cancer Babies have soft skins. a banana/potato skin B1 [C or U] the skin of an animal that has been removed from the body, with or without the hair or fur: Native Americans used to trade skins . a rug made from the skin of a lion

skin noun (OUTER COVERING)

[C or U] any outer covering: The bullet pierced the skin of the aircraft.

skin noun (LIQUID)

[S] a thin surface that forms on some liquids, such as paint, when they are left in the air, or others, such as heated milk, when they are left to cool

skin noun (COMPUTER)

[C] specialized internet & telecoms the pictures, designs, colours, etc. that appear on the screen of a mobile phone or other device, which the user is able to change: Many electronic devices let you create your own skins.
drenched/soaked/wet to the skin extremely wet: We had no umbrellas so we got soaked to the skin in the pouring rain.
thin/thick skin easily/not easily upset by criticism: I don't worry about what he says - I have a very thick skin.
-skin
suffix uk   /-skɪn/ us  
I've got an old sheepskin coat.
-skinned
suffix uk   /-d/ us  
pale-skinned

skin

verb [T] uk   /skɪn/ (-nn-) us  
to remove the skin of something: The hunters skinned the deer they had killed. I skinned my knee (= hurt my knee by rubbing skin off it) when I fell down the steps.
(Definition of skin from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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