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English definition of “snow”

snow

noun uk   /snəʊ/ us    /snoʊ/

snow noun (WEATHER)

A1 [U] the small, soft, white pieces of ice that sometimes fall from the sky when it is cold, or the white layer on the ground and other surfaces that it forms: Outside the snow began to fall. Let's go and play in the snow! A blanket of snow lay on the ground. Her hair was jet-black, her lips ruby-red and her skin as white as snow.Snow and iceCold [C] a single fall of snow: We haven't had many heavy snows this winter.Snow and iceCold

snow noun (DRUG)

[U] slang → cocaineSpecific types of drugDrugs - general wordsSpecific medicines and drugs

snow

verb uk   /snəʊ/ us    /snoʊ/

snow verb (WEATHER)

A2 [I] If it snows, snow falls from the sky: It's snowing. It's starting to snow. It had snowed overnight and a thick white layer covered the ground.Snow and iceCold be snowed in C2 to be unable to travel away from a place because of very heavy snow: We were snowed in for four days last winter.Snow and iceCold

snow verb (TRICK)

[T] US informal to deceive or trick someone by clever talk or by giving them a lot of information: She always snowing the bosses with statistics.Lies, lying and hypocrisyDishonest people
(Definition of snow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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