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English definition of “spark”

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spark

noun uk   /spɑːk/ us    /spɑːrk/

spark noun (CAUSE)

C2 [S] a first small event or problem that causes a much worse situation to develop: That small incident was the spark that set off the street riots.
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spark noun (FIRE/ELECTRICITY)

C2 [C] a very small piece of fire that flies out from something that is burning, or one that is made by rubbing two hard things together, or a flash of light made by electricity: Sparks were flying out of the bonfire and blowing everywhere. You can start a fire by rubbing two dry pieces of wood together until you produce a spark.spark of anger, inspiration, life, etc. a very small amount of a particular emotion or quality in a person
Idioms

spark

verb [T] uk   /spɑːk/ us    /spɑːrk/
C2 to cause the start of something, especially an argument or fighting: This proposal will almost certainly spark another countrywide debate about how to organize the school system. The recent interest rises have sparked new problems for the government. The visit of the G20 leaders sparked off (= caused the start of) mass demonstrations.
Translations of “spark”
in Korean 불꽃…
in Arabic شَرارة…
in French étincelle…
in Turkish kıvılcım, ateş, çakım…
in Italian scintilla…
in Chinese (Traditional) 原因, 導火線,誘因…
in Russian искра, проблеск…
in Polish iskra…
in Spanish chispa…
in Portuguese faísca…
in German der Funke…
in Catalan espurna…
in Japanese 火花, 火の粉…
in Chinese (Simplified) 原因, 导火线,诱因…
(Definition of spark from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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