term noun, verb - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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term

noun uk   /tɜːm/  us   /tɝːm/

term noun (TIME)

[C] the fixed period of time that something lasts for: He received a prison term for drunk driving. The government's term of office (= the period in which they have power) expires at the end of the year.A2 [C] mainly UK one of the periods into which a year is divided at school, college, or university: In Britain, the spring term starts in January and ends just before Easter. We're very busy in term-time (= during the term). [C] formal the period of time that a legal agreement lasts for: The lease on our house is near the end of its term. [U] specialized biology the end of a pregnancy when a baby is expected to be born: Her last pregnancy went to term (= the baby was born after the expected number of weeks). a full-term pregnancyin the long/medium/short term B2 for a long, medium, or short period of time in the future: Taking this decision will cost us more in the short term, but will be beneficial in the long term.
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term noun (DESCRIPTION)

B2 [C] a word or expression used in relation to a particular subject, often to describe something official or technical: "Without let or hindrance" is a legal term that means "freely".term of abuse an unkind or unpleasant name to call someoneterm of endearment a kind or friendly name to call someonein terms of/in ... terms B2 used to describe which particular area of a subject you are discussing: In financial terms, the project was not a success. In terms of money, I was better off in my last job.in no uncertain terms C2 in a very clear way: She told him what she thought of his behaviour in no uncertain terms (= she made her disapproval very clear).in strong, etc. terms using language that clearly shows your feelings: He complained in the strongest terms. She spoke of his achievements in glowing terms (= in a very approving way).
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term noun (RULES)

terms B2 [plural]
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the conditions that control an agreement, arrangement, or activity: terms of employment Under the terms of their contract, employees must give three months' notice if they leave.
on easy terms If you buy something on easy terms, you pay for it over a period of time.on equal terms (also on the same terms) having the same rights, treatment, etc.: British and overseas companies will compete for the government contract on equal terms.terms of reference formal the matters to which a study or report is limited

term

verb [T] uk   /tɜːm/  us   /tɝːm/
to give something a name or to describe it with a particular expression: Technically, a horse that is smaller than 1.5 metres at the shoulder is termed a pony.
(Definition of term noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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