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English definition of “vice”

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vice

prefix uk ( also vice-)   /vaɪs/ us  
used as part of the title of particular positions. The person who holds one of these positions is next below in authority to the person who holds the full position and can act for them: the vice captain of the team a vice admiral
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vice

noun uk   /vaɪs/ us  

vice noun (FAULT)

C2 [C or U] a moral fault or weakness in someone's character: Greed, pride, envy, and lust are considered to be vices. mainly humorous My one real vice (= bad habit) is chocolate. [U] illegal and immoral activities, especially involving illegal sex, drugs, etc.: The chief of police said that he was committed to wiping out vice in the city.

vice noun (TOOL)

[C] mainly UK ( US usually vise) a tool with two parts that can be moved together by tightening a screw so that an object can be held firmly between them while it is being worked on: Vices are often used to hold pieces of wood that are being cut or smoothed. Her hand tightened like a vice around his arm.
Translations of “vice”
in Korean 비행…
in Arabic رَذيلة…
in French étau…
in Turkish zaaf, kusur, kişilik zayıflığı…
in Italian vizio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 副職的, 副的…
in Russian порок, зло, преступление…
in Polish wada, prostytucja i narkotyki, imadło…
in Spanish torno de banco…
in Portuguese vício…
in German der Schraubstock…
in Catalan vici…
in Japanese 悪癖…
in Chinese (Simplified) 副职的, 副的…
(Definition of vice from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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