wall - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “wall”

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wall

noun uk   /wɔːl/  us   /wɑːl/
A1 [C] a vertical structure, often made of stone or brick, that divides or surrounds something: The walls in this apartment are so thin you can hear just about every word the neighbours say. The walls look a bit bare - can't we put some pictures up? We had to climb over a ten-foot wall to get into the garden. The Berlin Wall came down in 1989. [C] any outer part of a hollow structure in the body: the wall of the womb/stomach an artery wall [C] a mass of people or things formed in such a way that you cannot get through or past them: The demonstrators formed a solid wall to stop the police from getting past them. The shot curved past the Newcastle defensive wall and inside the far post. [C] in football, a row of players who stand ten yards away from where a free kick is taken in order to make scoring directly from the free kick more difficult: Rooney curved the free kick past the Newcastle defensive wall and inside the far post. [S] literary a large, powerful, usually fast moving mass of something: After the rains, the houses were washed away by a wall of mud/water. [S] a way of feeling or behaving that completely prevents two groups of people from communicating with or understanding each other: There is a wall of mistrust between the two groups.
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(Definition of wall from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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