wave Definition in Cambridge British English Dictionary
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Definition of "wave" - British English Dictionary

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waveverb [I or T]

uk   us   /weɪv/

wave verb [I or T] (MOVE HAND)

B1 to raise your hand and move it from side to side as a way of greeting someone, telling someone to do something, or adding emphasis to an expression: I waved to/at him from the window but he didn't see me. I was waving my hand madly but he never once looked in my direction. She was so annoyed she wouldn't even wave us goodbye/wave goodbye to us. She waves her hands about/around a lot when she's talking.wave sb away, on, etc. to make a movement with your hand that tells someone to move in a particular direction: You'll have to wait till the policeman waves this line of traffic on. You can't just wave me away as if I were a child!
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wave verb [I or T] (MOVE REPEATEDLY)

C1 to move from side to side, or to make something move like this while holding it in the hand: The corn waved gently in the summer breeze. A crowd of football fans ran down the street waving banners. He seems to think I can wave a magic wand and everything will be all right.

wave verb [I or T] (CURL HAIR)

If hair waves, it curls slightly: If she leaves her hair to dry on its own, it just waves naturally.

wavenoun [C]

uk   us   /weɪv/

wave noun [C] (WATER)

B1 a raised line of water that moves across the surface of an area of water, especially the sea: At night, I listened to the sound of the waves breaking/crashing against the shore.
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wave noun [C] (HAND MOVEMENT)

C2 the action of raising your hand and moving it from side to side as a way of greeting someone, etc.: Give Grandpa a wave.

wave noun [C] (BY A CROWD)

the Wave US (UK Mexican wave) a wave-like movement made by a crowd watching a sports game, when everyone stands and lifts up their arms and then sits down again one after another: The crowd did the Wave.

wave noun [C] (ENERGY)

B2 the pattern in which some types of energy, such as sound, light, and heat, are spread or carried: radio waves
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wave noun [C] (LARGE NUMBER)

C2 a larger than usual number of events of a similar, often bad, type, happening within the same period: a crime wave The country was swept by a wave of strikes.a new, second, etc. wave of sth an activity that is happening again or is being repeated after a pause: A new wave of job losses is expected this year.
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wave noun [C] (STRONG FEELING)

C2 A wave of an emotion or feeling is a sudden strong feeling that gets stronger as it spreads: A wave of panic swept through the crowd.
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wave noun [C] (HAIR CURVES)

a series of slight curves in a person's hair: Your hair has a natural wave whereas mine's just straight.
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(Definition of wave from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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