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English definition of “weave”

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weave

verb uk   /wiːv/ us  

weave verb (MAKE)

[I or T] (wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved) to make cloth by repeatedly crossing a single thread through two sets of long threads on a loom (= special frame): This type of wool is woven into fabric which will make jackets. [T] (wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved) to twist long objects together, or to make something by doing this: We were shown how to roughly weave ferns and grass together to make a temporary shelter. It takes great skill to weave a basket from/out of rushes. [T] literary (wove or US also weaved, woven or US also weaved) to form something from several different things or to combine several different things, in a complicated or skilled way: The biography is woven from the many accounts which exist of things she did.

weave verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I usually + adv/prep] (weaved, weaved) to go or make a path by moving quickly and changing direction often, especially to avoid hitting things: To escape from police officers the thief weaved through/between/in and out of stationary traffic on a bicycle.
weaver
noun [C] uk   /ˈwiː.vər/ us    /-vɚ/
a person whose job is weaving cloth and other materials: basket weavers
weaving
noun [U] uk   /ˈwiː.vɪŋ/ us  
There has been increasing automation of spinning and weaving.

weave

noun [C usually singular] uk   /wiːv/ us  
the way in which cloth has been woven, for example with the threads pulled firmly together, or the pattern produced by this process: a tight weave a striped/traditional weave
(Definition of weave from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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