whole - definition in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “whole”

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whole

adjective uk   /həʊl/  us   /hoʊl/
A2 complete or not divided: I spent the whole day cleaning. There's still a whole month till my birthday. After my exercise class, my whole body ached. The whole town was destroyed by the earthquake. This whole thing (= situation) is ridiculous. Bill does nothing but moan the whole time (= all the time). You have to stand up in court and promise to tell "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth". Her dance compositions added a whole (= completely) new dimension to the contemporary dance repertoire. informal used to emphasize something: I've got a whole heap of work to do this afternoon. The new computers are a whole lot (= much) faster.
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whole

whole

noun [C usually singular] uk   /həʊl/  us   /hoʊl/
a complete thing: Two halves make a whole. You must consider each problem as an aspect of the whole.the whole of sth B1 all of something: I'll be on holiday the whole of next week. The whole of his finger was bruised. The whole of the village (= everyone in the village) had come out for the party.
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(Definition of whole from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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