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English definition of “will”

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will

modal verb uk   /wɪl/ us  

will modal verb (FUTURE)

A2 ( also 'll) used to talk about what is going to happen in the future, especially things that you are certain about or things that are planned: Clare will be five years old next month. The train leaves at 8.58, so we'll be in Scotland by lunchtime. I'll see him tomorrow./I'll be seeing him tomorrow. Will Susie be there? It won't be easy to find another secretary. There'll be trouble when she finds out.
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will modal verb (ABLE/WILLING)

A1 ( also 'll) used to talk about what someone or something is able or willing to do: I'll give you a lift. Ask Gabriela if she'll take them. I've asked her but she won't come. The car won't start. This quantity of lasagne will feed six people.
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will modal verb (REQUEST)

A2 used to ask someone to do something: Will you give me her address? Will you give that to Tony when you see him, please? ( also 'll) used as a polite way of inviting someone to do something, or of offering someone something: Will you join us for a drink, Evie? Will you come in for a while? You'll have some cake, won't you, Charles?
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will modal verb (IF)

A2 ( also 'll) used in conditional sentences with 'if': If he's late again, I'll be very angry. I'll wait with Christopher if his mother isn't here when you go.
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will modal verb (LIKELY)

( also 'll) used to refer to what is likely: That'll be Scott at the door. That'll be his mother with him. As you will all probably already know, election day is next week.
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will modal verb (ORDER)

( also 'll) used when angry to tell someone to do something: Will you stop being such a pain! You'll go upstairs and you'll go straight to bed like your father told you!
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will modal verb (ALWAYS)

( also 'll) used when referring to something that always or usually happens: Accidents will happen. Fruit will keep longer in the fridge. The product with the better-known brand name will always sell better. She's 85 now, but she will insist on doing all her own housework.
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will

noun uk   /wɪl/ us  

will noun (MENTAL POWER)

B2 [C or U] the mental power used to control and direct your thoughts and actions, or a determination to do something, despite any difficulties or opposition: From an early age she had a very strong will. [+ to infinitive] After six months in hospital she began to lose the will to live (= the desire and determination to stay alive).C1 [S] what someone wants to happen: It was God's will. Against their will (= although they did not want to), they were forced to hold a meeting. The government has failed to impose its will upon regional communities (= to make them do as it wants).
See also
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will noun (DOCUMENT)

C2 [C] an official statement of what a person has decided should be done with their money and property after their death: Have you made a will yet? She left me some money in her will.
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will

verb uk   /wɪl/ us  

will verb (MAKE HAPPEN)

[+ obj + to infinitive ] If you will something to happen, you try to make it happen by the power of your thoughts: She willed herself to remember his name. [I or T] formal to want something: Stay or go, as you will.

will verb (LEAVE)

[T] to arrange to give money or property to others after your death
(Definition of will from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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