advance verb - definition in the Business English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online (US)

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English definition of “advance”

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advance

verb
 
 
/ədˈvɑːns/
[I or T] to develop and become successful, or to make something do this: Biotechnology continues to advance at a rapid pace.advance to sth She eventually advanced to vice-chairman of the bank.advance your career/interests/position Some employees decide to study for an MBA in order to advance their careers.
[I] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to increase in value: On the New York Stock Exchange 1,128 issues advanced and 1,057 declined .advance 5.5 cents/8p/10.9 points, etc. The general stock index advanced 1.94 points, or 0.04%, to 5291.45.advance against sth The dollar advanced against the Japanese yen.
[I] to increase in number, amount, or value: Overall, consumer prices are advancing at a modest rate. Pre-tax profits advanced 10% to €252m.
to suggest a new idea or plan to a group of people: Measures advanced by the General Assembly included reducing vehicle carbon-dioxide emissions.advance a plan/proposal/theory Several proposals for reform were advanced by members of Congress.
[T] FINANCE to give someone money before the usual time or before a piece of work is finished: advance sb sth Two weeks ago I hired him, and advanced him $10,000.advance sth to sb Evidence shows that lenders are becoming more discriminating in advancing loans to borrowers.
[T] to change the date or time of an event to an earlier one: No plans were made to advance the board meeting.
(Definition of advance verb from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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