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English definition of “cheap”

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cheap

adjective
 
 
/tʃiːp/
costing little money or less than is usual or expected: I got a cheap flight at the last minute. Food is usually cheaper in supermarkets. During times of mass unemployment, there's a pool of cheap labour for employers to draw from. →  See also inexpensive
if a store, restaurant, etc. is cheap, it charges low prices: This is the cheapest office supplies store in the city. →  See also inexpensive
low in quality and low in price: He bought some cheap shoes that fell apart after a couple of months.
US disapproving ( UK mean) unwilling to spend money: He's so cheap we didn't get a pay raise this year.
cheap and cheerful UK informal cheap, but good or enjoyable: There's a restaurant round the corner that serves cheap and cheerful food.
cheap and nasty UK informal costing little, and of bad quality: Spend a little more and avoid getting something that is just cheap and nasty.
(Definition of cheap adjective from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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