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English definition of “claim”

claim

noun [C]
 
 
/kleɪm/
INSURANCE a request to an insurance company for payment relating to an accident, illness, damage to property, etc.: pay/refuse/settle a claim An insurance adjuster will work with the injured party to settle the claim. file/make/submit a claim Do not submit a claim if the doctor or hospital is also filing a claim for the same service.
LAW a request to a court, government department, or company for something such as money or property that you believe you have a legal right to: a claim for sth The Court of Appeal upheld his claim for damages for wrongful dismissal.bring/file a claim against sb/sth He is now bringing an unfair dismissal claim against the company. a disability/unemployment/pension claim
LAW a legal right to own something such as a property, business, or title: have a claim on/to sth If you are joint owners, you have a claim on at least half the house. a legitimate/rightful/valid claim
a statement of something you believe is true, although you have no proof: The court rejected his claims that he was denied a promotion due to discrimination. → See also baggage claim, counter-claim, damage claim, exaggerated claim, expenses claim, pay claim, priority claim, small claim, statement of claim
(Definition of claim noun from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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